Hey there, recent grads from ADM, NYP, or LASALLE! Whether you’re from any of these schools or just starting your journey in the creative field in Singapore, this article is for you. I’m here to share some tips to help you ace your creative job interviews and avoid common mistakes.

First off, let’s cover some basic job interview advice. You’ll definitely need to prepare your portfolio and showreel, practice answering typical interview questions, talk about your work experience, and have some relevant questions ready to ask. These are the basics, so now let’s dive into the specific details that matter in the creative industry.

Acing Your Creative Job Interview

Do Your Homework

Even ChatGPT will advise the same. Start by digging into the company’s vibe.

“What’s their work like?”
“Who are their clients?”
“Who are creatives who make up their team?”

Social media stalking? Absolutely encouraged! Understanding the company’s ethos helps align your values and ensures you’re speaking the same language during the interview.

Stay Chill, You’re Already Awesome

Remember, you’ve got the skills. From an employer’s perspective, I wouldn’t invite someone for a chat if their work wasn’t already impressive. The interview is mainly to make sure there aren’t any glaring red flags. You don’t need to keep boasting about your skills; your work says it all (whether it’s good or bad, we can tell). Keep the vibe cool, calm, and collected.

— Status Dance

At a job interview, there’s bound to be a play of status: Employer vs Job Seeker. Usually, the employer is seen as having more control since they’re the ones offering the job. Even so, my advice is to keep it leveled as much as you can. Neither should you be desperate for the job, nor be arrogant and play hard to get. Be yourself, and see if its a right fit.

Know Your Worth

Don’t shy away from discussing salary expectations. Generally, creatives feel some level of discomfort when talking about money, but anchoring your rate not only showcases your confidence but also reflects your self-worth. Aim for a figure that matches your experience level and the value you bring to the table.

Now, let’s learn to do the opposite.

How to Bomb an Interview for a Creative Position:

The Art of Fabrication

Nothing ruins an interview faster than being dishonest. Employers are pretty sharp, especially in fields like ours where we work with creative types and big ego all the time. It’s easy for them to spot when someone’s trying to act like they know more than they actually do. Pretending to know stuff you don’t is just asking for trouble. Once they start digging deeper with follow-up questions, your lies are exposed. Keep it real.

Negativity, Anyone?

Bad-mouthing ex-companies or throwing shade at former colleagues? Yeah, that’s a major no-no. Keep the gossip at bay and focus on the positives. Occasionally, interviewers may even bait you into it, so as to assess for toxic traits. Be careful. Remember, you’re here to shine, not to spread negativity.

Conclusion

Alright, now you’re all set! With these tips, you can gauge how ready you are for interviews. And here’s a bonus idea: try practicing with a friend acting as the interviewer. I personally find it a great way to get comfortable and gain confidence. Remember, the more you practice, the better you’ll be at nailing that creative job interview.

Stay confident, stay genuine, and let your creative spirit shine through! Best of luck out there!

If you’re new to 3D graphics or looking to level up your skills, you’ve come to the right place. PBR materials allow you to create realistic surfaces in your 3D scenes. In this guide, I’ll walk you through the basics, but first,

What are PBR Materials?

PBR stands for Physically Based Rendering. Unlike traditional rendering techniques, PBR materials simulate how light interacts with real-world surfaces. This means your materials will look more accurate and lifelike.

“Hang on, materials and textures are different?!”

PBR materials are basically a collection of textures that are designed to be connected as maps into a Arnold/Redshift/<insert your renderer>StandardMaterial. “Hang on, materials and textures are different?!” Yup, read “Difference between Textures, Shaders, and Materials” for disambiguation.

How to Use PBR Materials:

  • Texture Basics:
    • PBR textures include maps for Base Color, Roughness, Height, Normal, Metallic, and Ambient Occlusion, each defining different material properties.
  • Material Setup:
    • Import and map the texture files onto your model in Blender or Maya, ensuring proper UV unwrapping. Be sure to interpret Base Color as sRGB, and the other maps as RAW data.
  • Connect Maps:
    • Link the maps to corresponding inputs of the Principled BSDF shader: Base Color to Base Color, Roughness to Reflection Roughness, etc.
    • If you need a video guide on connect maps, you can find it here.
  • Specialized Properties / Limitations:
    • Certain real-world material properties cannot be properly mimicked by game engines, hence they are not commonly supported as PBR materials. And we’d need to rely on offline renderers like Arnold or Redshift. Like believable murky liquids, colored glass, sheen etc.
    • Examples of specialized material properties
      • Implement opacity, translucency, and double-sided rendering for realistic leaf materials.
      • Implement thin film for oily, iridescent, or pearlescent materials.
  • Surface Imperfections:
    • Enhance material realism with surface imperfections like smudges, fingerprints, and water droplets, adjusting their blending and strength accordingly.
    • These maps can be layered on to supplement the base PBR material that has been pre-designed.

Conclusion

Using PBR materials is a reliable and predictable way enhance the realism of your 3D projects, and you can find them for free at PolyHaven. With a bit of practice, you’ll be creating realistic materials in no time. For a more detailed guide on doing this Blender, please visit “How to use PBR Textures in Blender”. Also, I’ll write about the common misconceptions of PBR Materials, just to help student-types out a little bit with all the confusing terminology and less intuitive features. Happy rendering, and stay tuned!